Saturday, August 13, 2011

Respect

It comes in to question a lot, not by me and not by people like me—usually–but a lot, by people who are in whatever ways not like me. For people more compassionate, considerate or thoughtful, respect is something earned but easily given. For those who do not have or grant it easily, respect is something worth living –or dying—for.
I think, at times, about the ways in which I have used respect: the ways I have wielded it, abused it, denied it.
Respect costs me nothing and yet it is an often overlooked, under estimated and undervalued commodity. It is a language, like the Dow, that I am learning bit by bit.
Respect is returning phone calls; being cognizant of the meaning of time and the importance of being on time; it is reliability and expectation; it is valuing advice and recognizing the value of finding something you’ve been searching for and cherishing it.
Respect is a noun and a verb.
It is the thing and the act.
Respect is—at least for me and certainly for people like me and unlike me—worthy of living –and while maybe not dying—worthy of fighting for.

When Apples Go Bad--part II

  1. Explained situation to first Apple Customer Service Rep.
  2. Informative, polite exchange leading to transfer to a rep. who could look into the specifics.
  3. Transferred to Dave.
  4. Explained more in-depth, took picture of IPod, emailed Dave.
  5. Dave explained policy, issued a special code and explained the exception.
  6. Dave took notes of the exchange and determines the store needs to be held accountable for their behavior.
  7. I am impressed.
  8. Happily awaiting package to return and exchange my daughter's broken IPod

When Apples Go Bad-Part I


  1. One current and three potential Apple customers enter the Apple store in Towson, MD.
  2. The "genius" at the "Genius Bar" misidentifies my daughter's Ipod as an Iphone.
  3. Genuis recommends I pay $119 to have the 3-month old Ipod replaced.
  4. We discuss the probability of that happening.
  5. Genius explains the situation to the manager in the back room...laughter permeates the store.
  6. Scott (the presumed laugher in point 5) explains his logic behind suggesting I pay $119 to have the Ipod replaced: he believes my daughter is a budding technologist who somehow destroyed the inner workings of her Ipod.
  7. We agree to disagree.

October Call for True Stories: Stories at the Storey

There are still a few slots available for to share your story at October's Stories at the Storey. October's theme is "a...